Raising Awareness of Your Business When Fundraising for Charity

We all like to do our bit for society whenever we can. But it isn’t always easy to know what to do for the best, especially from a business point of view. Luckily there are ways in which corporate fundraising can benefit the business as well as the charity that is chosen. You just have to understand the process so you can make as big a success of any fundraising event you choose.

 

Many businesses choose a particular charity to support for the long term. This may be a popular and familiar charity to many, or it may be a charity that is close to the business in some way. Whatever it may be, it can benefit from all the charity fundraising events that the company chooses to create.

 

This is where the benefits for the business come in as well. For starters it is a great way for everyone to get involved and have some fun outside of business hours. For example if you decide to organise a large BBQ and fun day for the staff, everyone can enjoy some downtime and getting to know each other outside of work. There are plenty of ways that people can get involved and enjoy helping in the organisation as well, so you can see how useful it can be with regard to teamwork.

 

Another bonus is the publicity that the business can enjoy. This will of course be a very positive thing, and news of the charity fundraising events may appear in many places. Local newspapers, news channels and other magazines and websites relevant to the nature of the business may all pick up on the story. It just goes to show how corporate fundraising can raise awareness in lots of different ways, instead of just raising cash.

 

This form of fundraising can also be a good way to give everyone in the business something else to bring them together. Regular events and ideas can be planned throughout the year, and everyone can have a say in what happens and what methods can be used to raise money for the chosen charity. Some businesses opt to change charities every year, while others stick with the same one the whole time. It is up to you what approach you take for your own business, but whatever it might be you can be sure you will appreciate the need to do your bit for charity.

 

It is also plain to see that everyone benefits from such an arrangement. The charity benefits from the donations; the employees benefit from getting together and enjoying the process; and the business benefits too. Publicity like this is never a bad thing, and the charity makes headlines as well. It’s a win-win situation.

 

Ateeya Manzoor is the Managing Director of Mayfair Management Group.

Ateeya has a commitment to realizing potential with her philanthropic work. Through numerous charitable causes, talks, writings and mentorship, she is committed showing those who struggle that there is always a way to ascend. She is currently working on her first book.

To read more, please visit here: http://ateeyamanzoorpost.simplesite.com

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Tips by Ateeya Manzoor to Build Better Business Structure

Once you’ve completed all the hard work from business startup through to the point where you start building a team, or you have an established team after several years in business, structure becomes very important.

The right structure will help you grow the business further, manage a growing team more effectively, and enable you as the CEO to become less operational and more strategic.

The following are the considerations suggested by Ateeya Manzoor when building a more solid structure for your business:

  1. Role of the CEO/Owner of the company

This sounds obvious, but when you’re in the thick of day to day operations and trying to keep everything running and on track, few business owners stop and assess their own role.

When you start building a team or you have an established team, your own role has to change as you bring in more people. You need to become the CEO rather than fill the role that many do of general manager involved in everything.

You need to shift your focus to more strategic matters like funding for expansion, assessment of growth opportunities, and building a strong team that can gradually take over your operational role.

Don’t make the mistake of trying to build a team without shifting your own role to how you can best add real value to your company.

When you get to point 3, it will be clear if you need to change your own role.

  1. Legal Ownership

Just assuming that you have a limited liability legal entity for your business structure, and have the right legal and financial structure in place to protect your business and personal assets

The other form of legal ownership is equity, usually when the owner of the company wants to ‘lock in’ good employees or reward those who perform well.

Once you give employee equity in your company, you set a precedent for others to follow. How much share of your business are you prepared to give others; on what basis will they earn it or buy in; what structure will you set up for shareholder voting rights; do all equity holders have the same weighted shareholding, and so on.

And finally, what happens when you have a falling out with one of those employees, and you can’t shake them off because they are an equity holder in your business. It happens.

You may consider two other options: reward good performance with a bonus system or bonus incentives. The other option to reward those who have contributed to the growth and success of your business by offering to sell your company to them when you’re ready to walk away

And remember, not everyone wants to have equity in your business, and too many people don’t understand that equity comes with responsibilities and legal duties. Think twice about this strategy.

  1. Your Organisation Chart

Often people don’t bother with this as it’s ‘too formal’ or ‘too structured’, but an organisation chart is a test of how well you’ve set up the structure of your business.

If you draw up your map of the organisation and you have boxes/roles with gaps and no-one to fill them, or you have others (usually the business owner) in more than one box, then your structure is not set up for future growth.

The key people, who report directly to the CEO or business owner, need to be able to take responsibility for their area, without having to defer to the CEO on the majority of decisions or problems.

If you have the team in place and you find they still have to go to you for advice on a regular basis, you need to factor in some more experienced and capable people into your structure.

Ateeya Manzoor is a Skilled Strategic and Risk Manager associated with Mayfair Management Group with over 20 years of experience. Through her 20+ year career spanning Bay Street and Main Street, she has worked on projects in the technology, legal, hospitality, property development, engineering, oil and gas and professional development industries.

Her talent is to anchor in businesses requiring structure or a fresh perspective. Clients value her vision and unrelenting commitment to delivering tangible results.

For more details, please visit here: http://ateeyamanzoorpost.simplesite.com

 

Evaluating Your Business Marketing Strategy: Ateeya Manzoor

Are you among the small businesses and professionals who find that they just do not achieve the intended goals or they cannot complete their marketing plans? Marketing plans can fall short for a number of reasons. One common reason for this failure is the business marketing strategy and not the action plans.

There are five measures of a business marketing strategy that must be present if your marketing plan and your tactics are to succeed.

  1. Shared goals with business strategy. It is absolutely necessary that you align your business marketing strategy with your business strategy. The marketing strategy needs to emanate from the business strategy. For example, if your plan is to grow your legal practice by promoting a focus on estate planning, it does not make a great deal of sense to advertise a focus on legal defense for juvenile delinquents.

  1. Respect the budget. The budget sets the limits for your business marketing strategy. No matter what audience you need to reach or what product or service you are marketing, budgets define reality. You must keep things in perspective within those limits if you expect to meet your marketing objectives.

  1. Comprehensive. Your business marketing strategy should outline all of your marketing goals, as well as the tactics you will use to accomplish them. It needs to encompass all of your marketing activities – traditional, internet, mobile, point of sale, etc. But it also needs to allow just enough flexibility to permit you to make some changes in order to take advantage of an unanticipated opportunity with a very high chance of success.

  1. A sense of perspective. It is unlikely that you will be marketing a single product or service to a single, specific audience. A successful business marketing strategy will keep all tactics and campaigns in perspective to maintain a focus on marketing objectives.

  1. Audience Determined. Ateeya Manzoor says that a good business marketing strategy will reflect significant research into the desires, needs and preferences of your target market. It will, then, use the tactics most likely to reach that audience where they can most commonly be found. It will reflect your understanding of the message they need to hear and the communication medium they prefer.

If your business marketing strategy can pass these five tests, you will be well on your way to crafting a winning marketing strategy that will achieve your goals and grow your business in the strategic direction you want the business to go.

Ms. Ateeya Manzoor is a managing director and management strategist and partner at Mayfair Management Group.

As a professional with over fifteen years of experience, Ateeya Manzoor has worked with a large range of clients in various industries and sizes, ranging from large publicly traded financial institutions and technology firms, large resorts to midsized oil and gas companies, to small non-profits requiring a fresh perspective.

To read more, please visit here: http://ateeyamanzoor.blogspot.com

Activity and Output from Business Perspective by Ateeya Manzoor

The word ‘activity’ will be used in this textbook as a general description to cover any physical operation that takes place in an enterprise. In a business providing bus transport for schoolchildren the activities will include driving the bus, cleaning the bus, making telephone calls to check routes and times, and ensuring that the administrative requirements, such as insurance and licenses, are in place.

In an NGO department providing assistance to elderly persons, the activities will include sending out home helps, paying the home helps, telephoning the clients to arrange visits and checking that spending is within the budget allowed.

In a product manufacturing business providing floor-cleaning machines the activities will include ordering parts, assembling parts, delivering the finished products to shops for sale, taking in returns for repair under warranty, paying employees and checking on the quality of the goods produced. These are all activities and they all cause costs to be incurred. The activities causing costs is central too much of the partition of costs and the collection of costs relating to a specific activity.

You can sometime find the phrase ‘activity-based costing’ has been created to recognize that management accounting is most effective when it links costs to the activities of the business.

Activities have to be measured. For the soft drink manufacturer the measure of activity is the number of cartons of soft drink sold. For the retail store it could be the number of items of garments sold, or it could be the value of clothing sold. Selling a large number of small-value items causes higher staffing costs than does selling a small number of high-value items. For the road haulage business the measure of activity could be the hours worked by drivers or the number of miles driven. Hours worked take no account of whether the drivers are on the road or waiting at the depot. Distance of miles traveled is a better measure of productive activity but do not distinguish full loads from empty trucks. Fuel costs are higher for a full load than for an empty truck.

Activity might be measured using a combined unit of kilogram-miles. Throughout the following chapters the word ‘activity’ will be used and measures of activity will be described. You will be expected to demonstrate your analytical skills in thinking about the meaning of the word and the relevance of the measure of activity to cost classification and cost behavior.

Output is a particular kind of activity. It is the product or service provided by the enterprise or by one of its internal sections. The output of a soft drink manufacturer is soft drinks; the output of a retail store is the clothing that it sells. Outputs are directly proportional to the activities. If we get some activities done, there must be some output. However, there are standard ratio between activity and output. If the ratio is not correct, the business will lead to a loss.

Ms. Ateeya Manzoor is a manageing director and management strategist and partner at Mayfair Management Group.

As a professional with over fifteen years of experience, Ateeya Manzoor has worked with a large range of clients in various industries and sizes, ranging from large publicly traded financial institutions and technology firms, large resorts to midsized oil and gas companies, to small non-profits requiring a fresh perspective.

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